Flying Insects

Identifying flying insects can be harder than most pests, but you can usually pinpoint the reason you have them, whether it's a seasonal thing, hygiene or building issue, or just plain bad luck

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European Paper Wasp
(Polistes dominula)

The European paper wasp unlike the Common wasp, are unlikely to disturb your picnic, going for your sandwiches or fizzy drinks. They prefer insects and only likely to sting when attacked

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European Hornet
(Vespa crabro)

The European hornet is not known to be aggressive unless you are attacking it, or its nest. These can be found in the south of Britain.

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Common Wasp
(Vespula vulgaris)

The common wasp is a colonial insect. Their nests are a paper pulp-like. The Common Wasp will nest in loft space, tree cavities and underground. Nests are usually noticed in late spring, peaking in the summer.

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Common Clothes Moth
(Tineola bisselliella)

Common clothes moth is a pest to be wary of. They will feed on natural fibres such as carpets, clothes, as well as store food products. Those mysterious little holes you get in your T-shirt, clothes moth.

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Filter fly
(Psychodidae)

Filter fly or Drain fly are usually found breeding where rotten organic material can be found. More of a nuisance fly than anything. You are most likely to start seeing them coming from bathroom/kitchen sinks.

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Indianmeal Moth
(Plodia interpunctella)

The Indian meal moth and its larvae can be very destructive to farms, food store places, they will eat on grain, dried fruits and varied processed food products.

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Green Bottle Fly
(Lucilia sericata)

The Green bottle fly is actually a blowfly, member of the family Calliphoridae. Common throughout the UK. Can be found eating on fruit, dead animals, rubbish areas.